About the project

“Learning through Sport” (LTS) is an 18-months trans-continental Capacity Building in the field of youth project that aims to develop, test and spread innovative sports tools, that build-up soft skills in the youth and helps societies prevent juvenile delinquency. The project is coordinated by Champions Factory LTD and is involving sport youth organizations from Peru, Colombia, Brazil and Bulgaria, United Kingdom, Romania.

“Learning through Sport” (LTS) is an 18-months trans-continental Capacity Building in the field of youth project that aims to develop, test and spread innovative sports tools, that build-up soft skills in the youth and helps societies prevent juvenile delinquency. The project is coordinated by Champions Factory LTD and is involving sport youth organizations from Peru, Colombia, Brazil and Bulgaria, United Kingdom, Romania.
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“Learning through Sport” Objectives

To foster the cooperation and exchange of good practices between 6 organizations from 6 countries from 2 continents.

To improve the quality and recognition of youth work by developing, testing and spreading innovative “Learning through sports” tutorials for youth workers.

To improve the soft skills in youngsters, who are experiencing crime, participating in crime or are at risk of experiencing crime by involving them in a trans-national non-formal learning mobility.

To raise awareness on the use sports as a powerful tool to reach out youth.

“Learning through Sport” Objectives

To foster the cooperation and exchange of good practices between 6 organizations from 6 countries from 2 continents.

To improve the quality and recognition of youth work by developing, testing and spreading innovative “Learning through sports” tutorials for youth workers.

To improve the soft skills in youngsters, who are experiencing crime, participating in crime or are at risk of experiencing crime by involving them in a trans-national non-formal learning mobility.

To raise awareness on the use sports as a powerful tool to reach out youth.

“Learning through Sport” Background

Juvenile delinquency, also known as “juvenile offending”, is the participation in illegal behavior by juvenile delinquents – minors, usually defined as being between the ages of 10 and 18, who have committed some act that violates the law. This phenomenon has turned into a widespread threat to the security of our cities and has a negative impact on the development of our society. Statistical data shows that the proportion of violent acts committed by youth has been increasing in the last years and more specifically, the countries involved in “Learning through sports” project are facing high criminal rates:

  • In the United Kingdom, according to the Youth Justice Statistics from April 2016-March 2017, 28400 children and young people were cautioned or convicted, the Children and young people from a BAME  (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic)background are over-represented in custody, 1,600 children and young people were sentenced to custody and 42.2% of children and young people were reoffended.
  • In April 2017 the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights urged the authorities in Romania to acknowledge the severe discrimination against Roma and to implement the 2015-2020 Roma Inclusion Strategy.
  • Pamplona Alta is one of the poorest neighbourhoods in Peru and is the one that has the highest rates of crime. The so-called “Wall of Shame” in the capital Lima stands at three metres tall and is built of thick concrete and crowned with reels of barbed wire. This imposing barrier is one of the starkest examples of Peru’s growing penchant for gated communities, as it was built to exclude poor and disadvantaged citizens from more affluent areas of the city. The Pamplona Alta youth inhabitant so often fall victims to robbery and theft or are engaged in crime actions, due to poverty and lack of opportunities for social engagement.
“Learning through Sport” Background

Juvenile delinquency, also known as “juvenile offending”, is the participation in illegal behavior by juvenile delinquents – minors, usually defined as being between the ages of 10 and 18, who have committed some act that violates the law. This phenomenon has turned into a widespread threat to the security of our cities and has a negative impact on the development of our society. Statistical data shows that the proportion of violent acts committed by youth has been increasing in the last years and more specifically, the countries involved in “Learning through sports” project are facing high criminal rates:

  • In the United Kingdom, according to the Youth Justice Statistics from April 2016-March 2017, 28400 children and young people were cautioned or convicted, the Children and young people from a BAME  (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic)background are over-represented in custody, 1,600 children and young people were sentenced to custody and 42.2% of children and young people were reoffended.
  • In April 2017 the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights urged the authorities in Romania to acknowledge the severe discrimination against Roma and to implement the 2015-2020 Roma Inclusion Strategy.
  • Pamplona Alta is one of the poorest neighbourhoods in Peru and is the one that has the highest rates of crime. The so-called “Wall of Shame” in the capital Lima stands at three metres tall and is built of thick concrete and crowned with reels of barbed wire. This imposing barrier is one of the starkest examples of Peru’s growing penchant for gated communities, as it was built to exclude poor and disadvantaged citizens from more affluent areas of the city. The Pamplona Alta youth inhabitant so often fall victims to robbery and theft or are engaged in crime actions, due to poverty and lack of opportunities for social engagement.
  • Nearly four in every 1,000 Brazilian adolescents living in Brazil’s biggest cities are murdered before the age of 19, according to a new UN report that illustrates how Brazilian youth pay the highest price for crime and violence. High-profile violent crimes involving adolescents have inflamed the issue and polarised opinion around a controversial measure in Congress to lower the age of criminal responsibility from 18 to 16, which is to be voted in March 2018.
  • In Bulgaria the range and number of violence and crime are quite broad, having in mind the current refugee crisis and the ongoing Roma conflicts. The Bulgarian Ministry of Youth and Sports has included in its priorities the social inclusion of disadvantaged youth groups from a different religion, background and origin.
  • In Colombia, children and adolescents below 18 years old represented 11 percent of all arrests made in 2017, with the 29,943 arrests reported by police, representing a 33 percent rise compared to 2016, according to the National Research Institute of Colombia.